Now, I know what you’re thinking. Most of the software and apps you use on a regular basis are made by massive companies or established development studios. Well, yes. But many successful apps, particularly those in the Apple and Google stores, are created and marketed by individuals and small businesses. In fact, independent developers made $20 billion in the App Store in 2016 alone.


There are quite literally hundreds of clever ways to make money online. From taking online surveys, to renting or selling your old clothes, flipping your iPhone to someone in a different country, and even buying low-cost products locally, just to resell them for a higher price on Amazon. There’s truly no shortage of unique ways to make money online.
You could also opt to use existing websites for making money. These include both active income and passive income methods. For example, you could sell some used items or invest in creating some digital designs that then can be sold on merchandise. Again, devote a sizable portion of your time to passive income so that you can slowly build up earnings that will arrive on autopilot without any extra added effort. 
Find a profitable niche. Starting with your interests, write down as many niche ideas as you can. Think about topics people might search online. Ideas include passions (like surfing or body building), fears (like spiders or speaking in front of crowds) and problems (like getting out of debt). Do keyword research to see it others are interested in the topic. Find out if a domain name is available that matches the keyword 100 percent. [7]
The toughest thing for someone getting started is figuring out what to sell, whether they are a product creator or affiliate. It would be great if Clickbank spent some time showing websites and products that are doing a good job. I understand this can be tough, since many product and website creators don't want their hard work copied by a bunch of students! However, examples of successful entrepreneurs doing the same thing you're doing would be good for inspiration.

Now next, you’ll want to pick a WP theme from somewhere like Elementor, ThemeForest, Elegant Themes, Qode Interactive, OptimizePress or grab one of my top picks for the best WordPress themes you can use today. This is the barebones design of your site, which you can then customize with your own branding, copy, and images. That being said, you don’t want to cheap out. It costs less than $100 to buy a theme that will make your website look professional (and you can upgrade to a completely custom design once you get the business going). You'll also need strong marketing tools to grow your website, like HubSpot's All-in-One Marketing plugin.
Once you have that problem or need nailed, the next step is to validate that idea and make sure you’ve actually got customers who will pay for it. This means building a minimum viable product, getting objective feedback from real customers, incorporating updates, testing the market for demand, and getting pricing feedback to ensure there’s enough of a margin between your costs and what consumers are willing to pay.
If you have an e-book or online course that you'd like to promote, ClickBank makes that easy. Once you sign up as a vendor you can list your product with them and set the commission percentage you are willing to pay to anyone who chooses to market and promote your product for you. Once your product is listed, other ClickBank users will start promoting it on their own websites. This will drive traffic to the sales page on your website and hopefully result in sales.
The product they are trying to sell is a landing page building software. It's pretty pricey at $600. I mean, why should I pay $600 for this when I could buy the most popular page builder for WordPress — Thrive Architect for $67. Thrive Architect is an extremely popular landing page builder from a company dedicated to their product (not just a side project!). It integrates with WordPress as a plugin, meaning you can host your website ANYWHERE.
Strong copy and clear call to actions: If they have a written sales page you’ll likely find that it’s very convincing and keeps pulling you in to read more. They’re often story-driven as well. The buy now button will be unmissable and the whole page will be directing your attention to it to complete the purchase. It leaves no doubt in the visitor’s mind on what should be done next.
If you're ready to enter the ecommerce fray, you could sell your own stuff. Of course, along with selling your own stuff on your own website comes a whole slew of both responsibilities and technical configuration and requirements. For starters, you'll need a website and a hosting account. You'll also need a merchant account like ones offered by Stripe or PayPal. Then you'll need to design that site, build a sales funnel, create a lead magnet and do some email marketing.
I also attended a recent webinar (Sept 2017), and much of the content was newbie questions about how to manage time and how to get started. Those will be interesting for a real newbie who's just curious about online marketing, but for someone looking to take action, I saw very little “instruction”. The vast majority of the webinar was just looking at a static screen (CBU members area).
There’s plenty of work and clients to be found. If you know where to look. To start, you need to know if there is enough demand for your skill to make it worth the effort to go out looking for work. Start by searching for freelance postings on sites like Flexjobs, SolidGigs, Contena, greatcontent or one of the dozens of other skill-specific freelance job boards.

5. Fiverr – Fiverr is a great place to make a few bucks or spend a few bucks if you need some of the services people offer. Basically, everything is $5. You either pay $5 or charge $5. They call them “gigs.” You can offer your services however you choose. If you sell art and you’re fine selling pieces for $5 each, that’s a gig. If you’re a graphic designer and you want to offer your services for $10/hour, simply offer a 30 minute gig. If they need two hours of graphic design, they pay you $20, or $10/hour by buying four gigs. 
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