#2. Site Build It - Site Build It is my second choice for learning how to create an online business. The training is very good and you get one website with hosting included. There is no free option, which is one of the reasons that it is not my first choice. I started here back in 2007 and the education that I received was very valuable and helped me to achieve a great level of success.

#2: Another great program is Jon Dykstra's Niche Tycoon. This focuses on paid traffic and outsourcing content to make money with Google Adsense (and similar programs). It requires a bit more of a budget, and also has less of a support community than Wealthy Affiliate, so it's best for people with a bit of online marketing experience and some money to get their business going.
I typically trash Clickbank as a low-quality trash bin for discount digital products worth very little money, and even less of your time. But the website is still alive and well, and as we see with products like Google Sniper 2.0 and Freedom Formula 8, people are still touting it as a great place to find things to promote for your online business. I decided to investigate further to see if it's actually possible to make honest money on Clickbank.
It's simple to sign up as an affiliate of Clickbank - all you have to do is create an account, add in your preferred payment method (so that you can be paid any due commissions) - and you're good to go. That's the easy bit. You then go to the marketplace to find a product that you'd like to promote. Here's a good article by Clickbank on the basics of using the marketplace.
A site called User Testing will actually pay you a fee to evaluate websites. It typically pays you $10 for each video that you review – which typically takes about 20 minutes. If the work is there, and you are particularly good at it, you could earn up to $30 per hour. That’s a pretty solid pay rate for a work-at-home job. You wouldn’t have to work a whole lot of hours to generate a decent part-time monthly income.
Two-tier programs exist in the minority of affiliate programs; most are simply one-tier. Referral programs beyond two-tier resemble multi-level marketing (MLM) or network marketing but are different: Multi-level marketing (MLM) or network marketing associations tend to have more complex commission requirements/qualifications than standard affiliate programs.[citation needed]
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