Traffic is the heart and soul of a business. Without traffic, you simply aren't going to make money online, regardless of what you're selling or what business model you're using. There is a completely separate tab for traffic in the members area, so I had high expectations. However, it's limited to a few videos about Facebook Advertising, then some stuff about Instagram.
Find your niche partners, collaborators, and champions: As you’re creating your course, look for notable people who are also creating content in the space. Look at how their businesses operate and incorporate that into your own plan. You can also reach out to any influencers and make them affiliates for your own course. This way, they’ll be incentivized to share your content with their own audiences (which can be a major way to generate your first sales—it helps if you're using one of the best CRMs for small business—and start building your own community!)

For Pinterest you can just sign up, create an account and can start posting out images along with a link back to your website. One of the cool things about Pinterest is you don’t even need many followers to actually start getting traction. It all relies on how good your images look. You can see some of the images that I’ve posted out from my numerology site have gotten a lot of traction and I don’t even have that many followers on there:
Please note that some of the links below are affiliate links and at no additional cost to you, I will earn a commission. Know that I only recommend products, tools and learning resources I've personally used and believe are genuinely helpful, not because of the small commissions I make if you decide to purchase them. Most of all, I would never advocate for buying something that you can't afford or that you're not yet ready to implement.
The drawback is that it’s slow at first, it could take 2-3+ months to see your first sale if that is your main traffic source. It’s also tedious in the sense that it requires a lot of effort link building, especially if you’re trying to rank for highly competitive keywords. For an in-depth SEO blueprint, check out our how to rank in Google guide for beginners.
Be professional. When you submit a résumé, don’t type it in ALL CAPS and please don’t avoid the caps lock like the plague. Know how to use it without looking incompetent. Write in complete sentences with proper grammar. Of course, there will be exceptions, but even with the exceptions, you must keep it professional. You’re building their view of you.
25. Products – You can create your own product, such as an ebook or computer software. You would then use your blog as a promotion tool to get people to buy your product. As long as you create a legitimate product with a whole lot of value, you should be able to get some buyers, but like everything else with a blog, you’ll need the traffic to get the sells.
Create a killer course experience: With your course validated and in the works, you need to figure out how people will take it. Most course creators choose to host their courses (after going down the path of learning how to make a website) on their own blogs. This way, they get all the value of bringing customers back to their site on a regular basis. I host my own courses from a subdomain on my own site so I can easily add more. The course experience is incredibly important as well. And after trying most of the solutions, I highly recommend Teachable—an online platform designed specifically for courses.
With drop shipping, you’re effectively partnering with a manufacturer or wholesaler to sell their products. This way, you don’t pay upfront costs to buy inventory, aren’t sitting on unsold items taking up expensive warehouse space, and don’t have to deal with shipping the products yourself. You simply create your site, fill it with drop shippable products, and drive in customers, with almost everything else done for you. 
×