Understand How Commissions Are Calculated at ClickBank: Every product listed at ClickBank has a commission rate which is set by the vendor. It can range from 1% to 75%. When you are successful in driving a sale to that product, the sale procedure is processed by ClickBank and then the commission rate is calculated. The commission rate you get will be based on the remaining net sale amount. Now let’s consider an example of a product that has a 55% commission rate:


I have developed what I think is a pretty cool 11-part auto responder series that solves a critical problem people have in my niche – it includes a number of affiliate links as well (although not clickbank – yet). I currently have a squeeze page set up which I’m driving traffic to through using FB ads, but I’m finding that I’m having to pay way too much for every conversion ( > $1.50 per conversion).

I've worked my way up to between 1,500 and 3,000 avg daily visitors and I'm just a month and a week. So considering that nothing was payed for with anything but time and typing, I'd say I'm on to something.. Actually, the last article I wrote has gotten over 200 facebook likes and 6,000 views in two days. This might not mean much to a lot of you because you actually know what you're doing, but I'm proud. My problem is going to be an obvious one that many have asked, so admins I apologize to you. But for the love of this community, I need your help.
“How To Make Money From ClickBank in 2015” and it do no justice to the content shared. Everyone one is the digital marketing space know that traffic (quality) is the MOST important tool for “Make Money From ClickBank” and your 2000 words article provided only few hundred words on how to get traffic. I bet you wrote this article to collect emails from digital marketers and pitch them products from CB. Bad karma for you!
In April 2008 the State of New York inserted an item in the state budget asserting sales tax jurisdiction over Amazon.com sales to residents of New York, based on the existence of affiliate links from New York–based websites to Amazon.[45] The state asserts that even one such affiliate constitutes Amazon having a business presence in the state, and is sufficient to allow New York to tax all Amazon sales to state residents. Amazon challenged the amendment and lost at the trial level in January 2009. The case is currently making its way through the New York appeals courts.
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